GIGA THE MOST EXTENSIVE
COLLECTION OF
QUOTATIONS
ON THE INTERNET
Google
Search GIGA
Loading
Home
Page
GIGA
Quotes
Biographical
Name Index
Chronological
Name Index
Topic
List
Reading
List
Site
Notes
Varying Hare
Books
Crossword
Solver
Anagram
Solver
Subanagram
Solver
TOPICS:          A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z
PEOPLE:    #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z


WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 68 of 186    Next Page >> 

Not a mouse
  Shall disturb this hallowed house.
    I am sent, with broom, before,
      To sweep the dust behind the door.
      - A Midsummer Night's Dream (Puck at V, i)
        [Order]

Now it is the time of night
  That the graves, all gaping wide,
    Every one lets forth his sprite,
      In the churchway paths to glide.
      - A Midsummer Night's Dream (Puck at V, i)
        [Apparitions]

Now the hungry lion roars,
  And the wolf behowls the moon;
    Whilst the heavy ploughman snores,
      All with weary task fordone.
      - A Midsummer Night's Dream (Puck at V, i)
        [Night]

Such tricks hath strong imagination
  That, if it would but apprehend some joy,
    It comprehends some bringer of that joy;
      Or in the night, imagining some fear,
        How easy is a bush supposed a bear!
      - A Midsummer Night's Dream
         (Theseus at V, i) [Fear]

The best in this kind are but shadows; and the worst are no worse, if imagination amend them.
      - A Midsummer Night's Dream
         (Theseus at V, i) [Imagination]

The iron tongue of midnight hath told twelve.
  Lovers, to bed; 'tis almost fairy time.
      - A Midsummer Night's Dream
         (Theseus at V, i) [Midnight]

The lunatic, the lover, and the poet
  Are of imagination all compact.
    One sees more devils than vast hell can hold;
      That is the madman. The lover, all as frantic,
        Sees Helen's beauty in a brow of Egypt.
          The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling,
            Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven;
              And as imagination bodies forth
                The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen
                  Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothing
                    A local habitation and a name.
      - A Midsummer Night's Dream
         (Theseus at V, i) [Devil : Imagination]

The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling,
  Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven;
    And as imagination bodies forth
      The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen
        Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothing
          A local habitation and a name.
      - A Midsummer Night's Dream
         (Theseus at V, i) [Poets]

To show our simple skill,
  That is the true beginning of our end.
      - A Midsummer Night's Dream
         (prologue at V, i) [Beginnings]

Trust me, sweet,
  Out of silence yet I picked a welcome,
    And in the modesty of fearful duty
      I read as much as from the rattling tongue
        Of saucy and audacious eloquence.
      - A Midsummer Night's Dream
         (Theseus at V, i) [Welcome]

Where is our usual manager of mirth?
  What revels are in hand? Is there no play
    To ease the anguish of a torturing hour?
      - A Midsummer Night's Dream
         (Theseus at V, i) [Action : Amusements]

All is well ended, if the suit be won.
      - All's Well That Ends Well
         (King of France at epilogue), (altered)
        [Proverbs]

The king's a beggar, now the play is done.
  All is well ended if this suit be won,
    That you express content; which we will pay
      With strife to please you, day exceeding day.
        Ours be your patience then, and yours our parts;
          Your gentle hands lend us, and take our hearts.
      - All's Well That Ends Well
         (King of France at epilogue)
        [Books (Last Lines)]

Be able for thine enemy
  Rather in power than use, and keep thy friend,
    Under thy own life's key.
      - All's Well That Ends Well
         (Countess of Rossillion at I, i)
        [Friends]

Be checked for silence,
  But never taxed for speech.
      - All's Well That Ends Well
         (Countess of Rossillion at I, i)
        [Silence]

In delivering my son from me I bury a second husband.
      - All's Well That Ends Well
         (Countess of Rossillion at I, i)
        [Books (First Lines)]

Love all, trust a few,
  Do wrong to none.
      - All's Well That Ends Well
         (Countess of Rossillion at I, i)
        [Proverbs]

Love all, trust a few,
  Do wrong to none. Be able for thine enemy
    Rather in power than use, and keep thy friend
      Under thy own life's key. Be checked for silence,
        But never taxed for speech.
      - All's Well That Ends Well
         (Countess of Rossillion at I, i)
        [Prudence]

One that goes with him; I love him for his sake,
  And yet I know him a notorious liar,
    Think him a great way fool, solely a coward.
      Yet these fixed evils sit so fit in him
        That they take place when virtue's steely bones
          Look bleak i' th' cold wind; withal, full oft we see
            Cold wisdom waiting on superfluous folly.
      - All's Well That Ends Well (Helena at I, i)
        [Character]

'Tis the best brine a maiden can season her praise in.
      - All's Well That Ends Well
         (Countess of Rossillion at I, i) [Tears]

Yet these fixed evils sit so fit in him
  That they take place when virtue's steely bones
    Looks bleak i' th' cold wind; withal, full oft we see
      Cold wisdom waiting on superfluous folly.
      - All's Well That Ends Well (Helena at I, i)
        [Wisdom]

He did look far
  Into the service of the time, and was
    Discipled of the bravest. He lasted long,
      But on us both did haggish age steal on,
        And wore us out of act.
      - All's Well That Ends Well
         (King of France at I, ii) [Bravery]

No, madam, 'tis not so well that I am poor, though many of the rich are damned; but if I may have your ladyship's good will to go to the world, Isbel the woman and I will do as we may.
      - All's Well That Ends Well
         (Lavatch at I, iii) [Poverty]

There is more owing her than is paid, and more shall be paid her than she'll demand.
      - All's Well That Ends Well
         (Countess of Rossillion at I, iii)
        [Justice]

There's something in't
  More than my father's skill, which was the great'st
    Of his profession, that his good receipt
      Shall for my legacy be sanctified
        By th' luckiest stars in heaven; and would your honor
          But give me leave to thy success, I'd venture
            The well-lost life of mine on his grace's cure
              By such a day and hour.
      - All's Well That Ends Well
         (Helena at I, iii) [Luck]


Displaying page 68 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 [68] 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

 WWW.GIGA-USA.COM     Back to Top of Page 
The GIGA name and the GIGA logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
GIGA-USA and GIGA-USA.COM are servicemarks of the domain owner.
Copyright © 1999-2013 John C. Shepard. All Rights Reserved.
Last Revised: 2013 March 16
Click > HERE < to report errors

Buy a good book from
Varying Hare Books
Buy book by
William Shakespeare
from
Varying Hare Books