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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
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Are not these woods
  More free from peril than the envious court?
      - As You Like It (Duke Senior at II, i)
        [Proverbs]

Here feel we not the penalty of Adam;
  The seasons' difference, as the icy fang
    And churlish chiding of the winter's wind,
      Which, when it bites and blows upon my body
        Even till I shrink with cold, I smile and say
          'This is no flattery'; these are counsellors
            That feelingly persuade me what I am.
      - As You Like It (Duke Senior at II, i)
        [Winter]

Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile,
  Hath not old custom made this life more sweet
    Than that of painted pomp? Are not these woods
      More free from peril than the envious court?
      - As You Like It (Duke Senior at II, i)
        [Trees]

Sweep on, you fat and greasy citizens;
  'Tis just the fashion. Wherefore do you look
    Upon that poor and broken bankrupt there?
      - As You Like It (First Lord at II, i)
        [Proverbs]

Sweet are the uses of adversity,
  Which, like the toad, ugly and venomous,
    Wears yet a precious jewel in his head;
      And this our life, exempt from human haunt,
        Finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks,
          Sermons in stones, and good in everything.
      - As You Like It (Duke Senior at II, i)
        [Adversity : Life : Preaching]

Sweet are the uses of adversity,
  Which, like the toad, ugly and venomous,
    Wears yet a precious jewel in his head.
      - As You Like It (Duke Senior at II, i)
        [Adversity : Proverbs]

To-day my Lord of Amiens and myself
  Did steal behind him as he lay along
    Under an oak, whose antique root peeps out
      Upon the brook that brawls along this wood,
        To the which place a poor sequest'red stag
          That from the hunter's aim had ta'en a hurt
            Did come to languish; and indeed, my lord,
              The wretched animal heaved forth such groans
                That their discharge did stretch his leathern coat
                  Almost to bursting, and the big round tears
                    Coursed one another down his innocent nose
                      In piteous chase; and thus the hairy fool,
                        Much marked of the melancholy Jaques,
                          Stood on th' extremest verge of the swift brook,
                            Augmenting it with tears.
      - As You Like It (First Lord at II, i)
        [Tears]

But, poor old man, thou prun'st a rotten tree
  That cannot so much as a blossom yield
    In lieu of all thy pains and husbandry.
      - As You Like It (Orlando at II, iii)
        [Trees]

Let me be your servant;
  Though I look old, yet I am strong and lusty,
    For in my youth I never did apply
      Hot and rebellious liquors in my blood,
        Nor did not with unbashful forehead woo
          The means of weakness and debility;
            Therefore my age is as a lusty winter,
              Frosty, but kindly.
      - As You Like It (Adam at II, iii) [Age]

Master, go on, and I will follow thee
  To the last gasp with truth and loyalty.
      - As You Like It (Adam at II, iii) [Service]

Take that, and he that doth the ravens feed,
  Yea, providently caters for the sparrow,
    Be comfort to my age.
      - As You Like It (Adam at II, iii)
        [Comfort : Providence]

If thou rememb'rest not the slightest folly
  That ever love did make thee run into,
    Thou hast not loved.
      - As You Like It (Silvius at II, iv) [Love]

My master is of churlish disposition
  And little recks to find the way to heaven
    By doing deeds of hospitality.
      - As You Like It (Corin at II, iv)
        [Hospitality]

When I was at home, I was in a better place, but travelers must be content.
      - As You Like It (Touchstone at II, iv)
        [Traveling]

I can suck melancholy out of a song as a weasel sucks eggs.
      - As You Like It (Jaques at II, v)
        [Melancholy]

Under the greenwood tree
  Who loves to lie with me,
    And turn his merry note
      Unto the sweet bird's throat,
        Come hither, come hither, come hither.
          Here shall he see no enemy
            But winter and rough weather.
      - As You Like It (Amiens at II, v) [Trees]

A fool, a fool! I met a fool i' th' forest,
  A motley fool! a miserable world!
    As I do live by food, I met a fool
      Who laid him down and basked him in the sun
        And railed on Lady Fortune in good terms,
          In good set terms, and yet a motley fool.
      - As You Like It (Jaques at II, vii) [Folly]

All the world's a stage,
  And all the men and women merely players;
    They have their exits and their entrances,
      And one man in this time plays many parts,
        His acts being seven ages.
      - As You Like It (Jaques at II, vii)
        [Age : Life : World]

All the world's a stage.
      - As You Like It (Jaques at II, vii)
        [Age : Life : Proverbs]

And in his brain,
  Which is as dry as the remainder biscuit
    After a voyage, he hath strange places crammed
      With observation, the which he vents
        In mangled forms.
      - As You Like It (Jaques at II, vii)
        [Traveling]

And then he drew a dial from his poke,
  And looking on it with lack-lustre eye,
    Says very wisely, 'It is ten o'clock.
      Thus we may see,' quoth he, 'how the world wags.
        'Tis but an hour ago since it was nine,
          And after one hour more 'twill be eleven;
            And so, from hour to hour, we ripe and ripe,
              And then, from hour to hour, we rot and rot;
                And thereby hangs a tale.'
      - As You Like It (Jaques at II, vii) [Time]

As I do live by food, I met a fool
  Who laid him down and basked him in the sun
    And railed on Lady Fortune in good terms,
      In good set terms, and yet a motley fool.
      - As You Like It (Jaques at II, vii)
        [Fortune]

Blow, blow, thou winter wind,
  Thou art not so unkind
    As man's ingratitude:
      Thy tooth is not so keen,
        Because thou art not seen,
          Although thy breath be rude.
      - As You Like It (Amiens at II, vii)
        [Ingratitude : Proverbs]

But whate'er you are
  That in this desert inaccessible,
    Under the shade of melancholy boughs,
      Lose and neglect the creeping hours of time;
        If ever you have looked on better days,
          If ever been where bells have knolled to church,
            If ever sat at any good man's feast,
              If ever from your eyelids wiped a tear
                And know what 'tis to pity and be pitied,
                  Let gentleness my strong enforcement be;
                    In the which hope I blush, and hide my sword.
      - As You Like It (Orlando at II, vii)
        [Gentleness]

I almost die for food, and let me have it!
      - As You Like It (Orlando at II, vii)
        [Eating]


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