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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 79 of 186    Next Page >> 

Say, what's thy name?
  Thou hast a grim appearance, and thy face
    Bears a command in't; though thy tackle's torn,
      Thou show'st a noble vessel. What's thy name?
      - Coriolanus (Aufidius at IV, v) [Face]

Thou hast beat me out
  Twelve several times, and I have nightly since
    Dreamt of encounters 'twixt thyself and me.
      - Coriolanus (Aufidus at IV, v) [Dreams]

Worthy Marcius,
  Had we no other quarrel else to Rome, but that
    Thou art thence banish'd, we would muster all
      From twelve to seventy; and, pouring war
        Into the bowels of ungrateful Rome,
          Like a bold flood o'erbeat.
      - Coriolanus (Aufidius at IV, v)
        [Banishment]

I'll never
  Be such a gosling to obey instinct, but stand
    As is a man were author of himself
      And knew no other kin.
      - Coriolanus (Coriolanus at V, iii)
        [Independence]

Like a dull actor now,
  I have forgot my part, and I am out,
    Even to a full disgrace.
      - Coriolanus (Coriolanus at V, iii) [Acting]

O, a kiss
  Long as my exile, sweet as my revenge!
    Now, by the jealous queen of heaven, that kiss
      I carried from thee dear; and my true lip
        Hath virgined it e'er since.
      - Coriolanus (Coriolanus at V, iii)
        [Kisses : Proverbs]

The noble sister of Publicola,
  The moon of Rome, chaste as the icicle
    That's curded by the frost from purest snow
      And hangs on Dian's temple--dear Valeria!
      - Coriolanus (Coriolanus at V, iii)
        [Chastity : Moon]

Think'st thou it honourable for a noble man
  Still to remember wrongs?
      - Coriolanus (Volumnia at V, iii) [Proverbs]

Thou know'st, great son,
  The end of war's uncertain, but this certain,
    That, if thou conquer Rome, the benefit
      Which thou shalt thereby reap is such a name
        Whose repetition will be dogged with curses,
          Whose chronicle thus writ: 'The man was noble,
            But with his last attempt he wiped it out,
              Destroyed his country; and his name remains
                To th' ensuing age abhorred,' Speak to me son.
                  Thou hast affected the fine strains of honor,
                    To imitate the graces of the gods;
                      To tear with thunder the wide cheeks o' th' air,
                        And yet to change thy sulphur with a bolt
                          That should rive an oak.
      - Coriolanus (Volumnia at V, iii) [Treason]

Bear from hence his body,
  And mourn you for him. Let him be regarded
    As the most noble corse that ever herald
      Did follow to his urn.
      - Coriolanus (First Lord at V, vi) [Graves]

Breaking his oath and resolution, like
  A twist of rotten silk.
      - Coriolanus (Aufidius at V, vi) [Proverbs]

My rage is gone,
  And I am struck with sorrow. Take him up.
    Help, three o' th' chiefest soldiers; I'll be one.
      Beat thou the drum, that it speaks mournfully,
        Trail your steel spikes. Though in this city he
          Hath widowed and unchilded many a one,
            Which to this hour bewail the injury,
              Yet he shall have a noble memory.
                Assist.
      - Coriolanus (Aufidus at V, vi)
        [Books (Last Lines)]

That, like an eagle in a dovecote, I
  Fluttered your Volscians in Corioles.
      - Coriolanus (Coriolanus at V, vi)
        [Proverbs]

Dissembling courtesy! How fine this tyrant
  Can tickle where she wounds!
      - Cymbeline (Imogen at I, i) [Courtesy]

You do not meet a man but frowns. Our bloods
  No more obey the heavens than our courtiers
    Still seem as does the King's.
      - Cymbeline (Gentleman at I, i)
        [Books (First Lines)]

. . . or ere I could
  Give him that parting kiss which I had set
    Betwixt two charming words--comes in my father,
      And like the tyrannous breathing of the north
        Shakes all our buds from growing.
      - Cymbeline (Imogen at I, iii) [Kisses]

Hast thou not learn'd me how
  To make perfumes? distil? preserve? yea, so
    That our great king himself doth woo me oft
      For my confections?
      - Cymbeline
         (Queen, wife to Cymbeline at I, v)
        [Perfume]

Ay, madam, with his eyes in flood with laughter.
      - Cymbeline (Iachimo at I, vi) [Laughter]

O dearest soul, your cause doth strike my heart
  With pity that doth make me sick.
      - Cymbeline (Iachimo at I, vi) [Cause]

'Tis plate of rare device and jewels
  Of rich and exquisite form, their values great,
    And I am something curious, being strange,
      To have them in sale stowage.
      - Cymbeline (Iachimo at I, vi) [Jewels]

And then a whoreson jackanapes must take me up for swearing, as if I borrowed mine oaths of him and might not spend them at my pleasure.
      - Cymbeline (Cloten at II, i) [Swearing]

When a gentlemen is disposed to swear, it is not for any standers-by to curtail his oaths.
      - Cymbeline (Cloten at II, i)
        [Profanity : Swearing]

Cytherea,
  How bravely thou becom'st thy bed, fresh lily,
    And whiter than the sheets!
      - Cymbeline (Iachimo at II, ii) [Lilies]

Hark, hark, the lark at heaven's gate sings,
  And Phoebus gins arise,
    His steeds to water at those springs
      On chaliced flowers that lies;
        And winking Mary-buds begin
          To ope their golden eyes.
            With every thing that pretty is,
              My lady sweet, arise,
                Arise, arise!
      - Cymbeline (Musicians at II, ii)
        [Larks : Marigolds]

O sleep, thou ape of death, lie dull upon her.
  And be her sense but as a monument,
    Thus in a chapel lying.
      - Cymbeline (Iachimo at II, ii) [Sleep]


Displaying page 79 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 [79] 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

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