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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 87 of 186    Next Page >> 

Nor do we find him forward to be sounded,
  But with a crafty madness keeps aloof
    When we would bring him on to some confession
      Of his true state.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Guildenstern at III, i) [Confession]

O, what a noble mind is here o'erthrown!
  The courtier's, soldier's, scholar's, eye, tongue, sword,
    Th' expectancy and rose of the fair state,
      The glass of fashion and the mould of form,
        Th' observed of all observers, quite, quite down!
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Ophelia at III, i) [Mind]

Rich gifts wax poor, when givers prove unkind.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Ophelia at III, i) [Proverbs]

The courtier's, soldier's, scholar's, eye, tongue, sword,
  Th' expectancy and rose of the fair state,
    The glass of fashion and the mould of form,
      Th' observed of all observers, quite, quite down!
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Ophelia at III, i) [Fashion]

The undiscovered country, from whose bourn
  No traveller returns, puzzles the will,
    And makes us rather bear those ills we have
      Than fly to others that we know not of?
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at III, i) [Patience]

Their perfume lost,
  Take these again, for to the noble mind
    Rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Ophelia at III, i) [Gifts]

Thus conscience does make cowards of us all.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at III, i) [Conscience : Proverbs]

Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
  And thus the native hue of resolution
    Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,
      And enterprises of great pitch and moment,
        With this regard their currents turn awry,
          And lose the name of action.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at III, i) [Conscience : Proverbs]

'Tis too much proved,--that with devotion's visage,
  And pious action, we do sugar o'er
    The devil himself.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Polonius at III, i) [Proverbs]

To be, or not to be--that is the question:
  Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
    The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune
      Or to take arms against a sea of troubles
        And by opposing end them. To die, to sleep--
          No more--and by a sleep to say we end
            The heartache, and the thousand natural shocks
              That flesh is heir to.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at III, i) [Doubt : Life : Trouble]

To die, to sleep--
  No more--and by a sleep to day we end
    The heartache, and the thousand natural shocks
      That flesh is heir to. 'Tis a consummation
        Devoutly to be wished. To die, to sleep--
          To sleep--perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub,
            For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
              When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
                Must give us pause.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at III, i) [Death : Sleep]

To take up arms against a sea of troubles,
  And, by opposing end them.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at III, i) [Proverbial Phrases]

We are oft to blame in this,
  'Tis too much proved, that with devotion's visage
    And pious action we do sugar o'er
      The devil himself.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Ophelia at III, i) [Hypocrisy]

Who would fardels bear,
  To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
    But that the dread of something after death,
      The undiscovered country, from whose bourn
        No traveller returns, puzzles the will,
          And makes us rather bear those ills we have
            Than fly to others that we know not of?
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at III, i) [Death]

With devotion's visage,
  And pious action, we do sugar o'er
    The devil himself.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Polonius at III, i) [Proverbs]

Ay, sir, but 'while the grass grows'--the proverb is something musty.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at III, ii) [Grass]

Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor. Suit the action to the word, the word to the action, with this special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at III, ii) [Discretion]

But, orderly to end where I begun,
  Our wills and fates do so contrary run
    That our devices still are overthrown;
      Our thoughts are ours, their ends none of our own.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Claudius, King of Denmark at III, ii)
        [Fate]

Call me what instrument you will, though you can fret me, you cannot play upon me.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at III, ii) [Contempt]

Come, the croaking raven doth bellow for revenge.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at III, ii) [Ravens]

Do you see yonder cloud that's almost in shape of a camel?
  By th' mass and 'tis, like a camel indeed.
    Methinks it is like a weasel.
      It is backed like a weasel.
        Or like a whale.
          Very like a whale.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet & Polonius at III, ii) [Clouds]

For anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now. was and is, to hold, as 'twere, the mirror up to nature, to show virtue her own feature, scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and pressure.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at III, ii) [Nature : Virtue]

For some must watch, while some must sleep;
  Thus runs the world away.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at III, ii) [Care : World]

Give me that man
  That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him
    In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart,
      As I do thee.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at III, ii) [Man : Passion]

Govern these ventages with your fingers and thumb, give it breath with your mouth, and it will discourse most eloquent music.
      - Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at III, ii) [Music]


Displaying page 87 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 [87] 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

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