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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 114 of 186    Next Page >> 

These earthly godfathers of heaven's light,
  That give a name to every fixed star,
    Have no more profit of their shining nights
      Than those that walk and wot not what they are.
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Berowne at I, i)
        [Astronomy]

Too much to know is to know nought but fame;
  And every godfather can give a name.
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Berowne at I, i)
        [Knowledge]

Why, all delights are vain, but that most vain
  Which, with pain purchased, doth inherit pain:
    As, painfully to pore upon a book,
      To seek the light of truth, which truth the while
        Doth falsely blind the eyesight of his look.
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Berowne at I, i)
        [Delight : Pain]

'with a child of our grandmother Eve, a female; or, for thy more sweet understanding, a woman.'
      - Love's Labor's Lost
         (Ferdinand, King of Navarre at I, i)
        [Women]

Devise, wit; write, pen; for I am for whole volumes in folio.
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Armado at I, ii)
        [Authorship]

Berowne they call him; but a merrier man,
  Within the limit of becoming mirth,
    I never spent an hour's talk withal.
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Rosaline at II, i)
        [Merriment]

Good Lord Boyet, my beauty, though but mean,
  Needs not the painted flourish of your praise:
    Beauty is bought by judgment of the eye,
      Not uttered by base sale of chapman's tongues.
      - Love's Labor's Lost
         (Princess of France at II, i) [Beauty]

His eye begets occasion for his wit;
  For every object that the one doth catch
    The other turns to a mirth-moving jest,
      Which his fair tongue, conceit's expositor,
        Delivers in such apt and gracious words,
          That aged ears play truant at his tales,
            And younger hearings are quite ravished,
              So sweet and voluble is his discourse.
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Rosaline at II, i)
        [Eloquence : Story Telling : Wit]

Therefore to's seemeth it a needful course,
  Before we enter his forbidden gates,
    To know his pleasure; and in that behalf;
      Bold of your worthiness, we single you
        As our best-moving fair solicitor.
      - Love's Labor's Lost
         (Princess of France at II, i) [Law]

Your wit's too hot, it speeds too fast, 'twill tire.
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Berowne at II, i)
        [Wit]

A woman that is like a German clock,
  Still a-repairing, ever out of frame,
    And never going aright, being a watch,
      But being watched that it may still go right!
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Berowne at III, i)
        [Clocks : Jewels]

This wimpled, whining, purblind, wayward boy,
  This signor-junior, giant-dwarf, Dan Cupid,
    Regent of love-rimes, lord of folded arms,
      The anointed sovereign of sighs and groans,
        Liege of all loiterers and malcontents,
          Dread prince of plackets, king of codpieces,
            Sole imperator and great general
              Of trotting paritors--O my little heart!
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Berowne at III, i)
        [Gods]

O heresy in fair, fit for these days,
  A giving hand, though foul, shall have fair praise.
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Princess at IV, i)
        [Generosity]

See, see--my beauty will be saved by merit.
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Princess at IV, i)
        [Beauty : Merit]

Here are only numbers ratified; but, for the elegancy, facility, and golden cadence of poesy, caret.
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Holofernes at IV, ii)
        [Poetry]

O thou monster Ignorance, how deformed dost thou look!
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Holofernes at IV, ii)
        [Ignorance]

Sir, he hath never fed of the dainties that are bred in a book.
  He hath not eat paper, as it were; he hath not drunk ink.
    His intellect is not replenished; he is only an animal, only sensible in the duller parts.
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Nathaniel at IV, ii)
        [Reading]

This is a gift that I have, simple, simple; a foolish extravagant spirit, full of forms, figures, shapes, objects, ideas, apprehensions, motions, revolutions. These are begot in the ventricle of memory, nourished in the womb of pia mater, and delivered upon the mellowing of occasion. But the gift is good in those in whom it is acute, and I am thankful for it.
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Holofernes at IV, ii)
        [Imagination]

A withered hermit, five-score winters worn,
  Might shake off fifty, looking in her eye:
    Beauty doth varnish age as if new-born,
      And gives the crutch the cradle's infancy.
        O, 'tis the sun that maketh all things shine!
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Berowne at IV, iii)
        [Beauty]

And when Love speaks, the voice of all the gods
  Make heaven drowsy with the harmony.
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Berowne at IV, iii)
        [Love]

Black is the badge of hell,
  The hue of dungeons, and the school of night;
    And beauty's crest becomes the heavens well.
      - Love's Labor's Lost
         (Ferdinand, King of Navarre at IV, iii)
        [Hell]

By heaven, I do love, and it hath taught me to rime, and to be mallicholy; and here is part of my rime, and here by mallicholy.
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Berowne at IV, iii)
        [Love]

Devils soonest tempt, resembling spirits of light.
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Berowne at IV, iii)
        [Temptation]

Here comes one with a paper: God give him grace to groan!
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Berowne at IV, iii)
        [Grace]

It adds a precious seeing to the eye:
  A lover's eyes will gaze an eagle blind.
    A lover's ear will hear the lowest sound,
      When the suspicious head of theft is stopped.
      - Love's Labor's Lost (Berowne at IV, iii)
        [Ears : Eyes : Love]


Displaying page 114 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 [114] 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

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