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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 148 of 186    Next Page >> 

Nay, but make haste, the better foot before.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (King John at IV, ii) [Haste]

The image of a wicked heinous fault
  Lives in his eye.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Pembroke at IV, ii) [Eyes]

Therefore, to be possessed with double pomp,
  To guard a title that was rich before,
    To gild refined gold, to paint the lily,
      To throw a perfume on the violet,
        To smooth the ice, or add another hue
          Unto the rainbow, or with taper-light
            To seek the beauteous eye of heaven to garnish,
              Is wasteful and ridiculous excess.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Salisbury at IV, ii) [Art]

Think you I bear the shears of destiny?
  Have I commandment on the pulse of life?
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (King John at IV, ii) [Destiny]

To gild refined gold, to paint the lily,
  To throw a perfume on the violet.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Salisbury at IV, ii)
        [Proverbial Phrases]

We cannot hold mortality's strong hand.
  Good lords, although my will to give is living,
    The suit which you demand is gone and dead.
      He tells us Arthur is deceased to-might.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (King John at IV, ii) [Death]

When workmen strive to do better than well,
  They do confound their skill in covetousness,
    And oftentimes excusing of a fault
      Doth make the fault the worse by the excuse,
        As patches set upon a little breach
          Discredit more in hiding of the fault
            Than did the fault before it was so patched.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Pembroke at IV, ii) [Covetousness : Faults]

With taper-light
  To seek the beauteous eye of heaven to garnish.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Salisbury at IV, ii) [Proverbs]

Beyond the infinite and boundless reach
  Of mercy, if thou didst this deed of death,
    Art thou damned, Hubert.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Bastard at IV, iii) [Crime]

Now for the bare-picked bone of majesty
  Doth dogged war bristle his angry crest
    And snarleth in the gentle eyes of peace.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Bastard at IV, iii) [War]

Trust not those cunning waters of his eyes,
  For villany is not without such rheum.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Salisbury at IV, iii) [Proverbs]

Whose tongue soe'er speaks false,
  Not truly speaks; who speaks not truly, lies.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Hubert at IV, iii) [Lying]

Hadst not thou been by,
  A fellow by the hand of nature marked,
    Quoted and signed to do a deed of shame,
      This murder had not come into my mind;...
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (King John at IV,ii) [Villainy]

Be stirring as the time, be fire with fire;
  Threaten the threat'ner, and outface the brow
    Of bragging horror.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Bastard at V, i) [Proverbs]

Be stirring as the time; be fire with fire.
  Threaten the threat'ner, and outface the brow
    Of bragging horror. So shall inferior eyes,
      That borrow their behaviors from the great,
        Grow great by your example and put on
          The dauntless spirit of resolution.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Bastard at V, i) [Resolution]

Outside or inside, I will not return
  Till my attempt so much be glorified
    As to my ample hope was promised
      Before I drew this gallant head of war,
        And culled there fiery spirits from the world,
          To outlook conquest and to win renown
            Even in the jaws of danger and of death.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Lewis at V, ii) [War]

Your breath first kindled the dead coal of wars
  Between this chastised kingdom and myself,
    And brought in matter that should feed this fire;
      And now 'tis far too huge to be blown out
        With the same weak wind which enkindled it.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Lewis at V, ii) [War]

Have I not hideous death within my view,
  Retaining but a quantity of life,
    Which bleeds away, even as a form of wax
      Resolveth from his figure 'gainst the fire?
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Melun at V, iv) [Death]

Unthread the rude eye of rebellion,
  And welcome home again discarded faith.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Melun at V, iv) [Rebellion]

When we were happy we had other names.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Salisbury at V, iv) [Names]

O, my sweet sir, news fitting to the night,
  Black, fearful, comfortless, and horrible.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Hubert at V, vi) [News]

I am the cygnet to this pale faint swan,
  Who chants a doleful hymn to his own death,
    And from the organ-pipe of fraity sings
      His soul and body to their lasting rest.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Prince Henry at V, vii) [Swans]

My heart hath one poor string to stay it by,
  Which holds but till thy news be uttered,
    And then all this thou seest is but a clod
      And module of confounded royalty.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (King John at V, vii) [News]

Nay, 'tis in a manner done already;
  For many carriages he hath dispatched
    To the seaside, and put his cause and quarrel
      To the disposing of the cardinal;
        With whom yourself, myself, and other lords,
          If you think meet, this afternoon will post
            To consummate this business happily.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Salisbury at V, vii) [Livery]

O, let us pay the time but needful woe,
  Since it hath been before hand with our griefs.
    This England never did, nor never shall,
      Lie at the proud foot of a conqueror
        But when it first did help to wound itself.
          Now these her princes are come home again,
            Come with three corners of the world in arms,
              And we shall shock them. Nought shall make us rue
                If England to itself do rest but true.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Bastard at V, vii) [Books (Last Lines)]


Displaying page 148 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 [148] 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

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