GIGA THE MOST EXTENSIVE
COLLECTION OF
QUOTATIONS
ON THE INTERNET
Google
Search GIGA
Loading
Home
Page
GIGA
Quotes
Biographical
Name Index
Chronological
Name Index
Topic
List
Reading
List
Site
Notes
Varying Hare
Books
Crossword
Solver
Anagram
Solver
Subanagram
Solver
TOPICS:          A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z
PEOPLE:    #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z


WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 173 of 186    Next Page >> 

The better sort,
  As thoughts of things divine, are intermixed
    With scruples, and do set the word itself
      Against the word:
        As thus, 'Come, little one,' and then again,
          'It is as hard to come as for a camel
            To thread the postern of a small needle's eye.'
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at V, v) [Difficulties]

Lords, I protest my soul is full of woe
  That blood should sprinkle me to make me grow.
    Come, mourn with me for what I do lament,
      And put sullen black incontinent.
        I'll make a voyage to the Holy Land
          To wash this blood off from my guilty hand.
            March sadly after. Grace my mournings here
              In weeping after this untimely bier.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at V, vi)
        [Books (Last Lines)]

Though I did wish him dead,
  I hate the murderer, love him murdered.
    The guilt of conscience take thou for thy labor,
      But neither my good word nor princely favor.
        With Cain go wander thorough shades of night,
          And never show thy head by day nor light.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Bolingbroke as King at V, vi)
        [Conscience]

Grim-visaged war hath smoothed his wrinkled front,
  And now, instead of mounting barbed steeds
    To fright the souls of fearful adversaries,
      He capers nimbly in a lady's chamber
        To the lascivious pleasing of a lute.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (King Richard at I, i) [Dancing : War]

Now is the winter of our discontent
  Made glorious summer by this son of York;
    And all the clouds that lowered upon our house
      In the deep bosom of the ocean buried.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (King Richard at I, i)
        [Books (First Lines) : Summer : Winter]

Why this it is, when men are ruled by women:
  'Tis not the kind that sends you to the Tower;
    My Lady Grey his wife, Clarence, 'tis she
      That tempers him to this extremity.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (King Richard at I, i) [Government]

I know so. But, gentle Lady Anne,
  To leave this keen encounter of our wits
    And fall something into a slower method--
      Is not the causer of the timeless deaths
        Of these Plantagenets, Henry and Edward,
          As blameful as the executioner?
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (King Richard at I, ii) [Wit]

I'll be at charges for a looking-glass
  And entertain a score or two of tailors
    To study fashions to adorn my body:
      Since I am crept in favor with myself,
        I will maintain it with some little cost.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (King Richard at I, ii) [Fashion]

Lady, you know no rules of charity,
  Which renders good for bad, blessings for curses.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (King Richard at I, ii) [Charity]

Shine out, fair sun, till I have bought a glass,
  That I may see my shadow as I pass.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (King Richard at I, ii) [Sun]

Teach not thy lip such scorn; for it was made
  For kissing, lady, not for such contempt.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (King Richard at I, ii) [Kisses]

That it may please you leave these sad designs
  To him that hath most cause to be a mourner,
    And presently repair to Crosby House;
      Where--after I have solemnly interred
        At Chertsey monast'ry with noble king--
          And wet his grave with my repentant tears--
            I will with all expedient duty see you.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (King Richard at I, ii) [Repentance]

Those eyes of thine from mine have drawn salt tears,
  Shamed their aspects with store of childish drops:
    These eyes, which never shed remorseful tear--
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (King Richard at I, ii) [Tears]

Was ever woman in this humor wooed?
  Was ever woman in this humor won?
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (King Richard at I, ii) [Wooing]

A virtuous and a Christianlike conclusion--
  To pray for them that have done scathe to us.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (Rivers at I, iii) [Christianity]

And thus I clothe my naked villany
  With old odd ends, stol'n out of holy writ,
    And seem a saint when most I play the devil.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (Gloucester at I, iii) [Proverbs]

But then I sigh, and, with a piece of Scripture,
  Tell them that Gods bids us do good for evil:
    And thus I clothe my naked villainy
      With odd old ends stol'n forth of holy writ,
        And seems a saint, when most I play the devil.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (King Richard at I, iii) [Evil : Villainy]

I cannot tell: the world is grown so bad
  That wrens make prey where eagles dare not perch.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (King Richard at I, iii) [World]

Since every Jack became a gentleman,
  There's many a gentle person made a Jack.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (King Richard at I, iii) [Gentlemen]

Talkers are no good doers.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (First Murderer at I, iii) [Proverbs]

The worm of conscience still begnaw thy soul!
  Thy friends suspect for traitors while thou liv'st,
    And take deep traitors for the dearest friends!
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (Queen Margaret at I, iii) [Conscience]

They that stand high have many blasts to shake them,
  And if they fall, they dash themselves to pieces.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (Queen Margaret at I, iii)
        [Destiny : Greatness : Proverbs]

They that stand high have many blasts to shake them.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (Queen Margaret at I, iii)
        [Destiny : Proverbs]

Tut, tut, my lord! we will not stand to prate;
  Talkers are no good doers. Be assured:
    We go to use our hands, and not our tongues.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (First Murderer at I, iii) [Talk]

Are you drawn forth among a world of men
  To slay the innocent? What is my offense?
    Where is the evidence that doth accuse me?
      What lawful quest have given their verdict up
        Unto the frowning judge? or who pronounced
          The bitter sentence of poor Clarence's death
            Before I be convict by course of law?
              To threaten me with death is most unlawful:
                I charge you, as you hope [to have redemption
                  By Christ's dear blood shed for our grievous sins,]
                    That you depart, and lay no hands on me.
                      The deed you undertake is damnable.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Third
         (Clarence at I, iv) [Law : Wickedness]


Displaying page 173 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 [173] 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

 WWW.GIGA-USA.COM     Back to Top of Page 
The GIGA name and the GIGA logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
GIGA-USA and GIGA-USA.COM are servicemarks of the domain owner.
Copyright © 1999-2013 John C. Shepard. All Rights Reserved.
Last Revised: 2013 March 16
Click > HERE < to report errors

Buy a good book from
Varying Hare Books
Buy book by
William Shakespeare
from
Varying Hare Books