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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 178 of 186    Next Page >> 

I reckon this always, that a man is never undone till he be hanged. not never welcome to a place till some certain shot be paid and the hostess say welcome.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Launce at II, v) [Welcome]

I to myself am dearer than a friend,
  For love is still most precious in itself,
    And Sylvia--witness heaven that made her fair!--
      Shows Julia but a swarthy Ethiope.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Proteus at II, vi) [Self-love]

Unheedful vows may heedfully be broken,
  And he wants it that wants resolved will
    To learn his wit t' exchange the bad for better.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Proteus at II, vi) [Character]

Base men, that use them to so base effect!
  But truer stars did govern Proteus' birth;
    His words are bonds, his oath are oracles,
      His love sincere, his thoughts immaculate,
        His tears pure messengers sent from his heart,
          His heart as far from fraud as heaven from earth.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Julia at II, vii) [Character]

But truer stars did govern Proteus' birth;
  His words are bonds, his oaths are oracles,
    His love sincere, his thoughts immaculate,
      His tears pure messengers sent from his heart,
        His heart as far from fraud as heaven from earth.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Julia at II, vii) [Fraud]

Didst thou but know the inly touch of love,
  Thou wouldst as soon go kindle fire with snow
    As seek to quench the fire of love with words.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Julia at II, vii) [Love]

I do not seek to quench your love's hot fire,
  But qualify the fire's extreme rage,
    Lest it should burn above the bounds of reason.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Lucetta at II, vii) [Love]

The more thou dam'st it up, the more it burns.
  The current that with gentle murmur glides,
    Thou know'st, being stopped, impatiently doth rage;
      But when his fair course is not hindered,
        He makes sweet music with th' enameled stones,
          Giving a gentle kiss to every sedge,
            He overtaketh in his pilgrimage.
              And so by many winding nooks he strays
                With willing sport to the wild ocean.
                  Then let me go and hinder not my course.
                    I'll be as patient as a gentle stream
                      And make a pastime of each weary step,
                        Till the last step have brought me to my love;
                          And there I'll rest, as after much turmoil
                            A blessed soul doth in Elysium.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Julia at II, vii) [Brooks]

A woman sometime scorns what best contents her.
  Send her another; never give her o'er,
    For scorn at first makes after-love the more.
      If she do frown, 'tis not in hate of you,
        But rather to beget more love in you.
          If she do chide, 'tis not to have you gone,
            For why the fools are mad if left alone.
              Take no repulse, whatever she doth say;
                For 'get you gone,' she doth not mean 'away.'
                  Flatter and praise, commend, extol their graces;
                    Though ne'er so black, say they have angels' faces.
                      That man that hath a tongue, I say is no man,
                        If with his tongue he cannot win a woman.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Valentine at III, i) [Wooing]

A woman sometimes scorns what best contents her.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Valentine at III, i) [Proverbs]

And, may I say to thee, this pride of hers,
  Upon advice, hath drawn my love from her;
    And, where I thought the remnant of mine age
      Should have been cherished by her childlike duty,
        I now am full resolved to take a wife
          And turn her out to who will take her in.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Duke of Milan at III, i) [Duty]

But neither bended knees, pure hands held up,
  Sad sighs, deep groans, nor silver-shedding tears,
    Could penetrate her uncompassionate sire.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Proteus at III, i) [Proverbs]

Except I be by Silvia in the night,
  There is no music in the nightingale;
    Unless I look on Silvia in the day,
      There is no day for me to look upon.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Valentine at III, i) [Love]

Hope is a lover's staff; walk hence with that
  And manage it against despairing thoughts.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Proteus at III, i) [Hope]

Take no repulse, whatever she doth say;
  For 'get you gone,' she doth not mean 'away.'
    Flatter and praise, commend, extol their graces;
      Though ne'er so black, say they have angels' faces.
        That man that hath a tongue, I say is no man,
          If with his tongue he cannot win a woman.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Valentine at III, i) [Flattery]

The hair that covers the wit is more than the wit, for the greater hides the less.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Launce at III, i) [Proverbs]

Time is the nurse and breeder of all good.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Proteus at III, i) [Time]

To be slow in words is a woman's only virtue.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Launce at III, i) [Women]

Win her with gifts, if she respect not words.
  Dumb jewels often in their silent kind
    More than quick words do move a woman's mind.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Valentine at III, i) [Gifts : Wooing]

If I can do it
  By aught that I can speak in his dispraise,
    She shall not long continue love to him.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Proteus at III, ii) [Slander]

Say upon the altar of her beauty
  You sacrifice your tears, your sighs, your heart.
    Write till your ink be dry, and with your tears
      Moist it again, and frame some feeling line
        That may discover such integrity.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Proteus at III, ii) [Wooing]

Write till your ink be dry, and with your tears
  Moist it again, and frame some feeling line
    That may discover such integrity.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Proteus at III, ii) [Authorship]

But to the purpose--for we cite our faults
  That they may hold excused our lawless lives;
    And partly, seeing you are beautified
      With goodly shape, and by your own report
        A linguist, and a man of such perfection
          As we do in our quality much want--
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (First Outlaw at IV, i) [Linguists]

Come not within the measure of my wrath.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Valentine at IV, i) [Anger]

Then know, that I have little wealth to lose.
  A man I am, crossed with adversity;
    My riches are these poor habiliments,
      Of which if you should here disfurnish me,
        You take the sum and substance that I have.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Valentine at IV, i) [Adversity]


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