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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 179 of 186    Next Page >> 

Ay, gentle Thurio, for you know that love
  Wilt creep in service where it cannot go.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Proteus at IV, ii) [Service]

Her hair is auburn, mine is perfect yellow--
  If that be all the difference in his love,
    I'll get me such a colored periwig.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Julia at IV, iv) [Hair]

Madam, 'twas Ariadne passioning
  For Theseus' perjury and unjust flight,
    Which I so lively acted with my tears
      That my poor mistress, moved therewithal,
        Wept bitterly; and would I might be dead,
          If I in thought felt not her very sorrow!
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Julia at IV, iv) [Tears]

By penitence th' Eternal's wrath's appeas'd.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Valentine at V, iv) [Proverbs]

How use doth breed a habit in a man!
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Valenine at V, iv) [Proverbs]

How use doth breed a habit in a man!
  This shadowy desert, unfrequented woods,
    I better brook than flourishing peopled towns.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Valentine at V, iv) [Habit]

I hold him but a fool that will endanger
  His body for a girl that loves him not.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Thurio at V, iv) [Folly]

My shame and guilt confounds me.
  Forgive me, Valentine. If hearty sorrow
    Be a sufficient ransom for offense,
      I tender't here. I do as truly suffer
        As e'er I did commit.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Proteus at V, iv) [Sorrow]

O heaven, were man
  But constant, he were perfect! That one error
    Fills him with faults, makes him run through all th' sins;
      Inconstancy falls off ere it begins.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Proteus at V, iv) [Constancy]

Please you, I'll tell you as we pass along,
  That you will wonder what hath fortuned.
    Come, Proteus, 'tis your penance but to hear
      The story of your loves discovered;
        That done, our day of marriage shall be yours:
          One feast, one house, one mutual happiness.
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Valentine at V, iv)
        [Books (Last Lines) : Home]

The private wound is deepest. O time most accurst,
  'Mongst all foes that a friend should be the worst!
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Valentine at V, iv) [Wounds]

Who should be trusted, when one's right hand
  Is perjured to the bosom? Proteus,
    I am sorry I must never trust thee more,
      But count the world a stranger for thy sake.
        The private wound is deepest. O time most accurst,
          'Mongst all foes that a friend should be the worst!
      - The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (Valentine at V, iv) [Trust]

I never heard yet that any of these bolder vices wanted less impudence to gainsay what they did, than to perform it first.
      - The WInter's Tale [Vice]

If you shall chance, Camillo, to visit Bohemia on the like occasion whereon my services are now on foot, you shall see, as I have said, great differences betwixt our Bohemia and your Sicilia.
      - The Winter's Tale (Archidamus at I, i)
        [Books (First Lines)]

As like as eggs.
  [As like as two peas.]
      - The Winter's Tale (Leontes at I, ii)
        [Proverbial Phrases]

He makes a July's day short as December,
  And with his varying childness cures in me
    Thoughts that would thick my blood.
      - The Winter's Tale (Polixenes at I, ii)
        [Cheerfulness]

How sometimes nature will betray its folly,
  Its tenderness, and make itself a pastime
    To harder bosoms!
      - The Winter's Tale (Leontes at I, ii)
        [Nature : Weakness]

I am angling now,
  Though you perceive me not hos I give line.
      - The Winter's Tale (Leontes at I, ii)
        [Fishing]

Kissing with inside lip? stopping the career
  Of laughter with a sigh?
      - The Winter's Tale (Leontes at I, ii)
        [Kisses]

Know't,
  It will let in and out the enemy
    With bag and baggage.
      - The Winter's Tale (Leontes at I, ii)
        [Enemies]

Looking on the lines
  Of my boy's face, methoughts I did recoil
    Twenty-three years, and saw myself unbreeched,
      In my green velvet coat, my dagger muzzled
        Lest if should bite its master and so prove,
          As ornaments oft do, too dangerous.
      - The Winter's Tale (Leontes at I, ii)
        [Memory]

Nine changes of the wat'ry star hath been
  The shepherd's note since we have left our throne
    Without a burthen.
      - The Winter's Tale (Polixenes at I, ii)
        [Moon]

One good deed dying tongueless
  Slaughters a thousand waiting upon that.
    Our praises are our wages.
      - The Winter's Tale (Hermione at I, ii)
        [Deeds]

Our praises are our wages.
      - The Winter's Tale (Hermione at I, ii)
        [Praise : Proverbs]

Should all despair
  That have revolted wives, the tenth of mankind
    Would hang themselves.
      - The Winter's Tale (Leontes at I, ii)
        [Matrimony : Wives]


Displaying page 179 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 [179] 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

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