GIGA THE MOST EXTENSIVE
COLLECTION OF
QUOTATIONS
ON THE INTERNET
Google
Search GIGA
Loading
Home
Page
GIGA
Quotes
Biographical
Name Index
Chronological
Name Index
Topic
List
Reading
List
Site
Notes
Varying Hare
Books
Crossword
Solver
Anagram
Solver
Subanagram
Solver
TOPICS:          A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z
PEOPLE:    #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z


WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 152 of 186    Next Page >> 

I come no more to make you laugh. Things now
  That bear a weighty and a serious brow,
    Sad, high, and working, full of state and woe,
      Such noble scenes as draw the eye to flow
        We now present.
      - The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Speaker at prologue)
        [Books (First Lines)]

He has strangled
  His language in his tears.
      - The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (King Henry at V, i) [Language : Tears]

These should be hours for necessities,
  Not for delights; times to repair our nature
    With comforting repose, and not for us
      To waste these times.
      - The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Gardiner at V, i) [Repose]

But we are all men
  In our own natures frail.
      - The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Chancellor at V, iii) [Proverbs]

Men so noble,
  However faulty, yet should find respect
    For what they have been: 'tis a cruelty
      To load a falling man.
      - The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Cromwell at V, iii) [Cruelty]

Men that make
  Envy and crooked malice nourishment
    Dare bite the best.
      - The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Cranmer at V, iii) [Envy : Man]

My mind gave me,
  In seeking tales and informations
    Against this man, whose honesty the devil
      And his disciples only envy at,
        Ye blew the fire that burns ye: now have at ye!
      - The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Cromwell at V, iii) [Envy]

You play the spaniel,
  And think with wagging of your tongue to win me.
      - The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (King Henry at V, iii) [Tongue]

There is a fellow somewhat near the door, he should be a brazier by his face, for o' my conscience twenty of the dog-days now reign in's nose.
      - The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Porter's man at V, iv) [Face]

Henry the Sixth, in infant bands crowned King
  Of France and England, did this king succeed;
    Whose state so many had the managing
      That they lost France and made his England bleed:
        Which oft our stage hath shown; and for their sake,
          In your fair minds let this acceptance take.
      - The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (epilogue at epilogue)
        [Books (Last Lines)]

Hear him but reason in divinity,
  And, all-admiring, with an inward wish
    You would desire the king were made a prelate;
      Hear him debate of commonwealth affairs,
        You would say it hath been all in all his study;
          List his discourse of war, and you shall hear
            A fearful battle rend'red you in music;
              Turn him to any cause of policy,
                The Gordian knot of it he will unloose,
                  Familiar as his garter; that when he speaks,
                    The air, a chartered libertine, is still,
                      And the mute wonder lurketh in men's ears
                        To steal his sweet and honeyed sentences;
                          So that the art and practic part of life
                            Must be the mistress to this theoric;
                              Which is a wonder how his grace should glean it,
                                Since his addition was to courses vain,
                                  His companies unlettered, rude, and shallow,
                                    His hours filled up with riots, banquets, sports;
                                      And never noted in him any study,
                                        And retirement, any sequestration
                                          From open haunts and popularity.
      - The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (Canterbury at I, i) [Oratory]

It must be so, for miracles are ceased
  And therefore we must needs admit the means
    How things are perfected.
      - The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (Canterbury at I, i) [Miracles]

Never was such a sudden scholar made;
  Never came reformation in a flood
    With such a heady currance scouring faults;
      Nor never Hydra-headed willfulness
        So soon did lose his seat--ant all at once--
          As in this king.
      - The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (Canterbury at I, i) [Reformation]

The strawberry grows underneath the nettle,
  And wholesome berries thrive and ripen best
    Neighbored by fruit of baser quality;
      And so the prince obscured his contemplation
        Under the veil of wildness, which, no doubt,
          Grew like the summer grass, fastest by night,
            Unseen, yet crescive in his faculty.
      - The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (Ely at I, i) [Fruits : Strawberries]

Turn him to any cause of policy,
  The Gordian knot of it he will unloose
    Familiar as his garter; that when he speaks,
      The air, a chartered libertine, is still,
        And the mute wonder lurketh in men's ears
          To steal his sweet and honeyed sentences; . . .
      - The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (Canterbury at I, i) [Policy]

Yea, at that very moment
  Consideration like an angel came
    And whipped th' offending Adam out of him,
      Leaving his body as a paradise
        T' envelop and contain celestial spirits.
      - The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (Canterbury at I, i) [Consideration]

Awake remembrance of these valiant dead,
  And with your puissant arm renew their feats.
    You are their heir; you sit upon their throne;
      The blood and courage that renowned them
        Runs in your veins; and my thrice-puissant liege
          Is in the very May-morn of his youth,
            Ripe for exploits and mighty enterprises.
      - The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (Ely at I, ii) [Youth]

Either our history shall with full mouth
  Speak freely of our acts, or else our grave,
    Like Turkish mute, shall have a tongueless mouth,
      Not worshipped with a waxen epitaph.
      - The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (King Henry at I, ii) [Epitaphs]

Therefore doth heaven divide
  The state of man in divers functions,
    Setting endeavor in continual motion;
      To which is fixed as an aim or butt
        Obedience; for so work the honeybees,
          Creatures that by a rule in nature teach
            The act of order to a peopled kingdom.
              They have a king, and officers of sorts,
                Where some like magistrates correct at home,
                  Others like merchants venture trade abroad,
                    Others like soldiers armed in their stings
                      Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds,
                        Which pillage they with merry march bring home
                          To the tent-royal of their emperor,
                            Who, busied in his majesties, surveys
                              The singing masons building roofs of gold,
                                The civil citizens kneading up the honey,
                                  The poor mechanic porters crowding in
                                    Their heavy burdens at his narrow gate,
                                      The sad-eyed justice with his surly hum
                                        Delivering o'er to executors pale
                                          The lazy yawning drone.
      - The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (Canterbury at I, ii) [Bees : Government]

We never valued this poor seat of England,
  And therefore, living hence, did give ourself
    To barbarous license; as 'tis ever common
      That men are merriest when they are from home.
      - The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (King Henry at I, ii) [Merriment]

While that the armed hand doth fight abroad,
  Th' advised head defends itself at home;
    For government, through high, and low, and lower,
      Put into parts, doth keep in one consent,
        Congreeing in a full and natural close,
          Like music.
      - The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (Exeter at I, ii) [Government]

O England! model to thy inward greatness,
  Like little body with a mighty heart,
    What mightst thou do that honour would thee do,
      Were all thy children kind and natural!
      - The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (Chorus at II, chorus) [England]

Base is the slave that pays.
      - The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (Pistol at II, i) [Slavery]

If little faults proceeding on distemper
  Shall not be winked at, how shall we stretch our eye
    When capital crimes, chewed, swallowed, and digested,
      Appear before us?
      - The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (King Henry at II, ii) [Crime]

The mercy that was quick in us but late,
  By your own counsel is suppressed and killed.
    You must not dare for shame to talk of mercy;
      For your own reasons turn into your bosoms
        As dogs upon their masters, worrying you.
      - The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (King Henry at II, ii) [Mercy]


Displaying page 152 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 [152] 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

 WWW.GIGA-USA.COM     Back to Top of Page 
The GIGA name and the GIGA logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
GIGA-USA and GIGA-USA.COM are servicemarks of the domain owner.
Copyright © 1999-2013 John C. Shepard. All Rights Reserved.
Last Revised: 2013 March 16
Click > HERE < to report errors

Buy a good book from
Varying Hare Books
Buy book by
William Shakespeare
from
Varying Hare Books