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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 157 of 186    Next Page >> 

Follow thy drum;
  With man's blood paint the ground, gules, gules!
    Religious canons, civil laws are cruel;
      Then what should war be? This fell whore of thine
        Hath in her more destruction than thy sword
          For all her cherubin look.
      - The Life of Timon of Athens
         (Timon at IV, iii) [War]

The learned pate
  Ducks to the golden fool. All's obliquy;
    There's nothing level in our cursed natures
      But direct villainy.
      - The Life of Timon of Athens
         (Timon at IV, iii) [Villainy]

Trust not the physician;
  His antidotes are poison, and he slays
    More than you rob.
      - The Life of Timon of Athens
         (Timon at IV, iii) [Medicine]

What an alteration of honour has
  Desperate want made!
      - The Life of Timon of Athens
         (Flavius at IV, iii) [Proverbs]

When thou wast in thy gilt and thy perfume, they mocked thee for too much curiosity; in thy rags thou know'st none, but art despised for the contrary. There's a medlar for thee; eat it.
      - The Life of Timon of Athens
         (Apemantus at IV, iii) [Curiosity]

Yet thanks I must you con
  That you are thieves professed, that you work not
    In holier shapes; for there is boundless theft
      In limited professions.
      - The Life of Timon of Athens
         (Timon at IV, iii) [Thieving]

My long sickness
  Of health and living now begins to mend,
    And nothing brings me all things.
      - The Life of Timon of Athens
         (Timon at V, i) [Sickness]

Promising is the very air o' th' time; it opens the eyes of expectation. Performance is ever duller for his act; and, but in the plainer and simpler kind of people, the deed of saying is quite out of use. To promise is most courtly and fashionable; performance is a kind of will or testament which argues a great sickness in his judgment that makes it.
      - The Life of Timon of Athens
         (Painter at V, i) [Expectation]

You are an alchemist; make gold of that.
      - The Life of Timon of Athens
         (Timon at V, i) [Alchemy]

Dead
  Is noble Timon, of whose memory
    Hereafter more. Bring me into your city,
      And I will use the olive with my sword,
        Make war breed peace, make peace stint war, make each
          Prescribe to other, as each other's leech.
            Let our drums strike.
      - The Life of Timon of Athens
         (Alcibiades at V, iv)
        [Books (Last Lines)]

But fish not with this melancholy bait
  For this fool gudgeon, this opinion.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Gratiano at I, i)
        [Bait]   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff: you shall seek all day ere you find them, when you have them they are not worth the search.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Bassanio at I, i)
        [Reason]   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

I am Sir Oracle,
  And when I ope my lips, let no dog bark!
      - The Merchant of Venice (Gratiano at I, i)
        [Oracle]   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano--
  A stage where every man must play a part,
    And mine a sad one.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Antonio at I, i)
        [World]   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

In my schooldays, when I had lost one shaft
  I shot his fellow of the selfsame flight
    The selfsame way, with more advised watch,
      To find the other forth; and by adventuring both
        I oft found both.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Bassanio at I, i)
        [Prudence]   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

In sooth I know not why I am so sad.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Antonio at I, i)
        [Books (First Lines)]   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

Let me play the fool;
  With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Gratiano at I, i)
        [Proverbs]   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

My ventures are not in one bottom trusted.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Antonio at I, i)
        [Proverbs]   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

Now by two-headed Janus,
  Nature hath framed strange fellows in her time:
    Some that will evermore peep through their eyes
      And laugh like parrots at a bagpiper,
        And other of such vinegar aspect
          That they'll not show their teeth in way of smile
            Though Nestor swear the jest be laughable.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Solanio at I, i)
        [Character]   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

Thanks i' faith; for silence is only commendable
  In a neat's tongue dried and a maid not vendible.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Gratiano at I, i)
        [Silence]   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come,
  And let my liver rather heat with wine
    Than my heart cool with mortifying groans.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Gratiano at I, i)
        [Merriment]   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

God made him, and therefore let him pass for a man.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Portia at I, ii)
        [Man]   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

Her name is Portia, nothing undervalued
  To Cato's daughter, Brutus' Portia;
    Nor is the wide world ignorant of her worth,
      For the four winds blow in from every coast
        Renowned suitors, and her sunny locks
          Hang on her temples like a golden fleece,
            Which makes her seat of Belmont Colcho's strond,
              And many Jasons come in quest of her.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Bassanio at I, ii)
        [Hair]   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

I dote on his very absence, and I wish them a fair departure.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Portia at I, ii)
        [Absence]   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

If I can catch him once upon the hip,
  I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him.
      - The Merchant of Venice (Shylock at I, ii)
        [Revenge]   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  


Displaying page 157 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 [157] 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

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